California State University, Long Beach
 

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dc.contributor.author Hernandez, Miguel (b. 09/20/1900 - d. 07/1985)
dc.contributor.author Hotchkis, Joan, interviewer
dc.date.accessioned 2022-10-21T19:23:42Z
dc.date.available 2022-10-21T19:23:42Z
dc.date.issued 2022-10-21
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/224422
dc.description SUBJECT BIO - Miguel (Mike) Hernandez came to work at Rancho Los Alamitos in 1946 and lived there until 1961. He was born in 1900 in Michoacan, Mexico. Hernandez' father came to work at Rancho Los Alamitos in 1906 while Hernandez was still in Mexico. Hernandez and the rest of his family came to California in 1914 to live with his father. But between the time Hernandez father sent for them and the time they arrived in El Paso, Texas, his father was killed in an accident in Long Beach. When Fred Bixby, owner of Rancho Los Alamitos found out the family was stranded in El Paso, he sent for them to come to the ranch and offered them a place to stay. Instead, Hernandez mother chose to live with one of Hernandez' uncles in Artesia, but often visited friends at the ranch. When Hernandez grew older, he began working for a flower growing farm in La Mirada. In 1946, however, Bixby offered Hernandez a higher salary than the flower growers, along with a place to live, and milk, eggs and vegetables from the ranch. So he moved with his family to the ranch and lived and worked there until 1961. At the time of the interview, he still worked for the Bixbys; now he guards the building on another ranch they still own. Joan Hotchkis conducted this interview in Hernandez' apartment in Los Angeles. He lives there with his wife who doesn't speak English. Hotchkis conducted this interview as part of a project to collect stories about Rancho Los Alamitos. TOPICS - Topics on this side of the tape include, family background, father coming to work at Rancho Los Alamitos, emigrating to California with his mother and siblings, father's death and move with uncle to Artesia;Topics on this tape include, education in Mexico, move to Artesia, working for flower armer in La Mirada, and coming to work at Rancho Los Alamitos as a gardenerTopics on this side of tape include, working at Rancho Los Alamitos, retirement and working part-time while living in Los Angeles; en_US
dc.description.abstract INTERVIEW DESCRIPTION - Joan Hotchkis, who conducted this interview, grew up in San Marino and her maternal grandparents lived nearby at Rancho Los Alamitos in Long Beach. When she was growing up, she visited there often with her parents and siblings. In 1979, she decided to interview some of the people shoe remembered living and working at the ranch when she visited. She was studying her own family history and planning to write about it. Eventually this led her to write and perform a one woman show that she presented across the United States and in Europe. TOPICS - Topics on this side of the tape include, family background, father coming to work at Rancho Los Alamitos, emigrating to California with his mother and siblings, father's death and move with uncle to Artesia;Topics on this tape include, education in Mexico, move to Artesia, working for flower armer in La Mirada, and coming to work at Rancho Los Alamitos as a gardenerTopics on this side of tape include, working at Rancho Los Alamitos, retirement and working part-time while living in Los Angeles; 6/19/1979 en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents *** File: mjhmhernandez1.mp3 Audio Segments and Topics: (0:00-14:37)... Hernandez' father emigrated to the US from Mexico, along with many other Mexicans, about the time of the Revolution of 1910. His father, Luis, came to California in 1906 when he was about 19 years old to work at Rancho Los Alamitos. Fred Bixby, the ranch's owner, sent some of his workers, including Hernandez father, to San Fransisco after the 1906 earthquake to help out there. Hernandez' father and mother had married in Mexico and had three children when his father came to California. His father heard about a possible job at the ranch from a relative who worked as a sheep hearder on another ranch that Bixby owned. (14:37-31:34)... Hernandez' father was working at Rancho Los Alamitos when he sent for his mother to bring the rest of the family to California in 1914. Before they arrived, however, his father was killed in a bicycle accident near Recreation Park. Hernandez' mother and her children traveled to El Paso on their way to California, but were waiting there to hear from his father. They sent letters to his father but received no response. When a relative passing through El Paso found out about the family's situation and told Fred Bixby about it, he arranged for them to come to the ranch. Only then did he tell them that Luis had died, but he offered them an opportunity to live at the ranch so the children could go to school. Hernandez' uncle soon showed up and wanted the family to live with him in Artesia. He also said he would make sure the children went to school, but they ended up chopping wood all day instead. Hernandez was 14 years old at the time. He had attended school for a little while in Mexico where he learned to write but he did not get to continue his education in Artesia. *** File: mjhmhernandez2.mp3 (0:00-12:56)... Hernandez' mother's family rented land and owned their own home in Mexico but because of the 1910 Revolution, his mother did not go back. Hernandez only finished the third grade in school in Mexico but he learned to read and write. When he came to California, his family stayed briefly at Rancho Los Alamitos and then moved to a ranch in Artesia. When his mother remarried, he lived with her and his stepfather and worked on their ten acres of land. When his mother died, his step-father told Hernandez to leave. He found a job on a flower farm owned by an Italian family in La Mirada where he worked from 1922 to 1946. He worked eight hours a day, seven days a week and earned $7 a day, except during the Depression, he only earned $2.50 a day. He left that job to work at Rancho Los Alamitos when Fred Bixby offered him $8 a day plus a house, milk, eggs and water. (12:56-21:55)... In 1946, Hernandez went to work on Rancho Los Alamitos and moved into a house on Palo Verde Avenue; he didn't pay any rent, but he paid for his own electricity. He worked as a gardner, six days a week, eight hours a day and earned $8 a day (21:55-26:18)... Hernandez married his first wife in 1920 and she died in 1960. Before she died, she was sick for nine months and could not move because she had cancer in her spine. They had two children and they lived in a house at Rancho Los Alamitos on Palo Verde Avenue (26:18-31:42)... At the time of the interview, Hernandez said he visited Mexico once a year and in 1940 he stayed for three months. He still had family in Mexico and used to own a house there, but gave it to his daughters. He and his wife had two sons of their own and adopted two daughters. End of tape *** File: mjhmhernandez3.mp3 (0:00-2:27)... In 1961 when Hernandez' first wife and mother to his two sons died, his relationship with his sons cooled. They visited him for about a year after her death but grew distant as time went on. Eventually they did not speak at all. One of his sons, at the time of the interview, was visiting him every Sunday but he does not see his other son. Hernandez's granddaughter, however, calls to ask how he is doing. (2:27-14:52)... Hernandez saw Fred Bixby everyday and he also had contact with Florence Bixby. She visited his home to see if his family needed anything like food or a new mattress and bedding. Once, Mr. and Mrs. Bixby sent him a new bed and always took care of him. The Bixbys never expected Hernandez to pay for anything they gave them like the bed or a refrigerator. When televsions became popular, he asked Bixby to help him get one. Bixby told Hernnandez that he could pay $10 a month until he'd paid for the television. Hernandez experienced some problems with another of Bixby's employess that did not understand why Hernandez had to borrow money and why, when he had money, he sent some of it to his sister in Mexico who was sick. (14:52-21:48)... When Hernandez first wife died he had $1,000 in funeral bills. Bixby paid the bills and let Hernandez pay off the debt at $20 a month. At the time of the interview, Hernandez was living in a Los Angeles apartment and earning $100.00 a week. His rent is $150 a month but he does not like living in the city. He works 15 hours a week, Mondays and Fridays. He collects Social Security but has no pension. His second wife, Beatrice, does not work because she is sick. She has medical insurance, but Hernandez cannot get medical insurance for himself because he still works. (21:48-30:34)... Hernandez works in the mornings until about 1 pm and then goes home to care for his wife. She may have to return to Mexico because of her health. When Hernandez and his wife visit Mexico, they do not rest; they like to take long walks and explore different places. In his spare time, Hernandez likes to sit outside and read the paper or take walks to the park. Sometimes he visits his neighbors or some of the people that he used to work with on the ranch. Hernandez stopped drinking in 1931 and he goes to church every Sunday. End of tape en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights This repository item may be used for classroom presentations, unpublished papers, and other educational, research, or scholarly use. Other uses, especially publication in any form, such as in dissertations, theses, articles, or web pages are not permitted without the express written permission of the individual collection's copyright holder(s). Please contact the CSULB Library Administration should you require permission to publish or distribute any content from this collection or if you need additional information or assistance in using these materials: https://www.csulb.edu/university-library/form/questionssuggestions-the-digital-repository-group en_US
dc.subject Rancho Los Alamitos - Hotchkis Collection en_US
dc.subject Mexican American-Chicano en_US
dc.title Hernandez, Miguel (audio interview #1 of 1) en_US
dc.type Recording, oral en_US


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